Author Archives: Justin A. Sattin

About Justin A. Sattin

I'm a vascular neurologist and residency program director. I created this blog in order to share some thoughts with my resident and other colleagues, and to foster my own learning as well.

The Beautiful Brain: The drawings of Santiago Ramón y Cajal

Santiago Ramón y Cajal is one of the founding fathers of neuroscience. He was the foremost proponent of the neuron theory–that the nervous system is composed of interconnected but individual neurons as opposed to a continuous reticulum of nervous tissue. … Continue reading

Posted in Medical Knowledge | Tagged | 2 Comments

A Zebra for Our Times: Transient Smartphone Blindness

Here’s a neurological oddity to be aware of: Transient smartphone blindness. Per a case report in this week’s Green Journal: When a patient lies on one side, the ipsilateral (lowermost) eye becomes functionally occluded (e.g., by a pillow) and its … Continue reading

Posted in Medical Knowledge | Tagged , | Comments Off on A Zebra for Our Times: Transient Smartphone Blindness

RITE Review

In follow-up to the publication of the textbook reviewed below, Dr. Berkowitz created a Facebook page and is posting board-style review questions on it. I think the plan is to post one per day. Have fun!

Posted in Medical Knowledge | Tagged | Comments Off on RITE Review

Neurology Book Report

“What should I read?” It’s a common question from students, especially future neurology residents, as well as advanced practice providers and allied health professionals set to care for neurological patients. It’s a hard question to answer because neurologists often rely … Continue reading

Posted in Medical Knowledge | Tagged , | Comments Off on Neurology Book Report

On the Interpretation of Neuroscientific Findings

By now, many readers will know that I’m a devotee of Peter Hacker’s Wittgenstein-infused critique of neuroscientific research. I recently came across a podcast of a lecture that he gave on the topic and the corresponding YouTube video above. Here’s … Continue reading

Posted in Medical Knowledge | Tagged , | 1 Comment

Assessing Consciousness

This week’s Green Journal has an interesting fMRI study in which the authors identify specific lesional areas in the pontine tegmentum that are associated with coma. The study raises the possibility that such imaging could be useful in the diagnosis and … Continue reading

Posted in Medical Knowledge | Tagged | Comments Off on Assessing Consciousness

Quick Followup on Torture

A few years ago, I posted an essay about the medical and psychological, professions’ involvement in torture, particularly of detainees in the war on terror, and my own possible light brush with that world. Last week the New York Times ran … Continue reading

Posted in Professionalism | Tagged | Comments Off on Quick Followup on Torture

Cui bono

Maria Popova’s Brain Pickings is a very interesting blog with articles and links relevant to what might be called popular neuroscience. As I’ve mentioned several times on this blog, however, one of my pet peeves with respect to some popular … Continue reading

Posted in Medical Knowledge | Tagged , | Comments Off on Cui bono

Involve the Palliative Care Team Early

Here’s a sad story about a family’s struggle with their young son’s fatal ordeal with New Onset Refractory Status Epilepticus (NORSE). NORSE is basically super-refractory status absent an obvious precipitating injury such as encephalitis. The main theme in this account is … Continue reading

Posted in Medical Knowledge, Patient Care | Tagged , | Comments Off on Involve the Palliative Care Team Early

Brain Death Resources

In light of the documented variability in the conduct of brain death evaluations around the country, and the ultra-high stakes, it’s extremely important for residents to know how to do this correctly. I recently became aware of a brain death … Continue reading

Posted in Medical Knowledge | Tagged | Comments Off on Brain Death Resources