Tag Archives: Neurological Education

Exam Videos

Dr. Hal Blumenfeld’s book, Neuroanatomy through Clinical Cases, is a great introductory text for neurology residents. It’s comprehensive, yet quite readable, with lots of superb drawings and illustrative cases. I think it occupies the space between Berkowitz’s Clinical Neurology and … Continue reading

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RITE Review

In follow-up to the publication of the textbook reviewed below, Dr. Berkowitz created a Facebook page and is posting board-style review questions on it. I think the plan is to post one per day. Have fun!

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Neurology Book Report

“What should I read?” It’s a common question from students, especially future neurology residents, as well as advanced practice providers and allied health professionals set to care for neurological patients. It’s a hard question to answer because neurologists often rely … Continue reading

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No Laughing Matter

Now that everyone’s settled into the new year, I’m sure that you’re all counting down the five months and three days until the 2016 RITE exam! Joy. If it makes you feel any better, I’m in a similar boat, with … Continue reading

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The Bionic Resident or: Competency Theater

Slogging through another revision of the residency program manual has gotten me thinking about competency and how we measure it. I accept the premise that there are multiple dimensions to physician competence–patient care skills, communication skills, professionalism, etc. These are … Continue reading

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The Queen of Specialties . . .

. . . is what neurology is sometimes called. NPR just did a nice little segment wherein they followed Dr. Allan Ropper making rounds at Mass. General, demonstrating that clinical acumen remains fundamental to our specialty. Nothing really new here for … Continue reading

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Black to Move

I skipped morning report today to attend some of the Continuum of Health Sciences Education Conference over at the medical school. The keynote address was an engrossing talk by Dr. K. Anders Ericsson, a psychology professor at Florida State, titled … Continue reading

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Some Other Neuro-Educational Resources

While we’re at it, here’s a few other helpful websites: The Neuro-Ophthalmology Virtual Education Library has lots of materials on that subject. The home page isn’t very helpful, as the site is organized by “collections” according to the (sometimes eminent) … Continue reading

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An Online Atlas of Adult Electroencephalography

Cruising the neurological corridors of the web this afternoon, I stumbled upon a promising resource for those learning EEG. It’s an online atlas created by Dr. David Strayhorn, an epileptologist in Maryland. The site is really well-organized, with an alphabetical … Continue reading

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Social Media as Vectors for Transmission of Psychogenic Illness

Laura Dimon has an interesting piece on The Atlantic’s website, titled “What Witchcraft is Facebook?” (with a picture of Dr. Charcot!) in which she reports on the phenomenon of mass psychogenic illness–basically an epidemic of conversion disorder. Conversion disorder, of … Continue reading

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